Travel staff are the weakest link in cybersecurity, says expert

Travel industry staff are the “weakest link” in the fight against cybercrime, a security expert has warned.

Cyber consultant Bruce Wynn said cybercrime attacks risked bringing down entire businesses.

He was speaking at the launch of anti-fraud group Profit’s Secure Our Systems campaign, backed by Travel Weekly.

Wynn, who has 40 years’ cybersecurity experience and is one of several experts supporting the seven-week campaign, which aims to give the industry the tools to fight cybercrime, said: “The weakest link in any cybersecurity chain is the thing that fills the space between the keyboard and the floor.”

There was a 92% rise in the number of cyberattack reports made to Action Fraud between January 2016 and September 2018, from 1,140 to 2,190, according to The City of London Police’s National Fraud Intelligence Bureau. Reports of hacking, in which fraudsters gain unauthorised access to data, saw the biggest increase, up 110%.

Wynn believes all travel firms will have experienced cyberattacks but some may not know it.

“You need to have planned well ahead for what you will do when you do discover you’ve been attacked, including how to recover from some of the damage that will have been caused,” he said.

He said a ransomware attack, for example, could be “catastrophic” as a company could lose all data without an adequate data recovery plan. It could also face a GDPR fine.

“It will cost you big time if criminals get into your system and even just corrupt your information to the point you can no longer do business confidently,” he warned.

Other threats include cloned websites, impersonating chief executives and insider fraud, with criminals using techniques such as phishing and hacking to get into companies’ computer systems to steal money or information.

Wynn said one of the most productive attacks is spear phishing, which targets an individual for sensitive or confidential information and often relies on the vulnerability of the person involved.

“The bad guys are going to get in and they will do damage,” he said. “Who are your staff going to call? Your troops need to know how to detect something suspicious, and what to do.

“Computer technicians can try to ‘backstop’ some of it, but staff need to be educated and trained and get a professional to assess how their business can best manage its risk in terms of cybercrime as part of its wider risk assessments.”

At the very minimum all companies should have up-to-date systems in place with anti-virus and anti-fraud software and back-up programs that are regularly tested to ensure any data lost can be recovered.

Wynn believes 80% of attacks can be mitigated at “almost zero cost” to businesses. “Thirty minutes now [on planning] could save lots of money, embarrassment, legal costs and even your business, later on,” he said.

Wynn recommended free resource Cyber Essentials, at cyberessentials.ncsc.gov.uk. The government-backed scheme offers guidelines on self-assessment and access to professional advice on cyber security.

What are the cyber threats?

Here are some common terms for malicious technology and fraudulent activity.

DDoS attack – a distributed denial-of-service attack is where multiple computers flood a server, website or network with unwanted traffic to make it unavailable to its intended users temporarily or indefinitely.

Ransomware – a type of malicious software (malware), usually deployed through spam or phishing, designed to block access to a computer system, typically by encryption, until a sum of money is paid. It can be spread through email attachments, infected software apps, compromised websites and infected external storage devices. Famous examples include the WannaCry attack last year.

Rootkits – a set of software tools that enable an unauthorised user to take over a computer system without detection.

Trojan – type of malicious software often disguised as a legitimate app, image, or program. Typically users are tricked into loading and putting Trojans on their systems.

Viruses – a piece of computer code capable of copying itself, normally deployed through a spam or phishing attack that typically has a detrimental effect, such as corrupting the system, stealing, or destroying data.

Worms – self-replicating malware that duplicates itself to spread to uninfected computers.

CEO fraud – a senior executive in a company is impersonated to divert payments for products and services to a fraudulent bank account. Typically the fraud will target the company’s finance department via email or over the telephone.

Account takeover fraud – a form of identity theft in which the fraudster accesses the victim’s bank or credit card accounts through a data breach, malware or phishing, to make unauthorized transactions.

Insider fraud – when an employee uses his or her position in an organization to steal money or information to threaten security

Cloned websites – when a fraudster copies or modifies an existing website design or script to create a new site in order to steal money.

Phishing – when emails purport to be from reputable companies to induce individuals to reveal personal information, such as passwords and credit card numbers.

Spearphishing – email scam targeted to one specific individual, organisation or business often to steal sensitive information for malicious purposes. These purport to be from someone you know and use your name.

SMiShing (or SMS phishing) – type of phishing attack where mobile phone users receive text messages with a website hyperlink which, if clicked on, will download a Trojan horse (malicious software) to the phone.

Hacking – unauthorised intrusion into a computer or network.

Bot– a computer infected with software that allows it to be controlled by a remote attacker. This term is also used to refer to the malware itself.

Exploit kit – code used to take advantage of vulnerabilities in software code and configuration, usually to install malware. This is why software must be kept updated.

Keylogger – a program that logs user input from the keyboard, usually without the user’s knowledge or permission, often using memory sticks on laptop ports.

Man-in-the-Middle Attack – similar to eavesdropping, this is where criminals use software to intercept communication between you and another person you are emailing, for example when you are using third-party wi-fi in a café or on a train.

Source: http://www.travelweekly.co.uk/articles/314616/travel-staff-are-the-weakest-link-in-cybersecurity-says-expert

Over third of large Dutch firms hit by cyberattack in 2016 – CBS

Large companies are hit by cyberattacks at an above average rate, according to the Cybersecurity Monitor of Dutch statistics bureau CBS for 2018. Among companies of 250+ employees, 39 percent were hit at least once by a cyberattack in 2016, such as a hack or DDoS attack. By contrast, around 9 percent of small companies (2-10 employees) were confronted with such an ICT incident.

Of the larger companies, 23 percent suffered from failure of business processes due to the outside cyberattacks. This compares to 6 percent for the smaller companies. Of all ICT incidents, failures were most common, for all sizes, though again, the larger companies were more affected (55%) than the smaller ones (21%). The incidents led to costs for both groups of companies.

Chance of incident bigger at large company

CBS noted that ICT incidents can arise from both from an outside attack and from an internal cause, such as incorrectly installed software or hardware or from the unintentional disclosure of data by an employee. The fact that larger companies suffer more from ICT incidents can be related to the fact that more people work with computers; this increases the chance of incidents. In addition, larger companies often have a more complex ICT infrastructure, which can cause more problems.

The number of ICT incidents also varies per industry. For example, small businesses in the ICT sector (12%) and industry (10%) often suffer from ICT incidents due to external attacks. Small companies in the hospitality sector (6%) and health and welfare care (5%) were less often confronted with cyberattacks.

Internal cause more common at smaller companies

Compared to larger companies, ICT incidents at small companies more often have an internal cause: 2 out 3, compared to 2 out of 5 for larger companies. ICT incidents at small companies in health and welfare care most often had an internal cause (84%). In the ICT sector, this share was 60 percent.

About 7 percent of companies with an ICT incident report them to one or more authorities, including police, the Dutch Data Protection Authority AP, a security team or their bank. The largest companies report ICT incidents much more often (41%) than the smallest companies (6%). Large companies report these ICT incidents most frequently to the AP, complying with law. After that, most reports are made to the police. The smallest companies report incidents most often to their bank.

Smaller: less safe

Small businesses are less often confronted with ICT incidents and, in comparison with large companies, take fewer security measures. Around 60 percent of small companies take three or more measures. This goes to 98 percent for larger companies.

Source: https://www.telecompaper.com/news/over-third-39-of-large-dutch-firms-hit-by-cyberattack-in-2016-cbs–1265851

The FBI Is Investigating More Cyberattacks in a California Congressional Race

The hacks — first reported by Rolling Stone — targeted a Democratic candidate in one of the country’s most competitive primary races

WASHINGTON — The FBI has opened an investigation into cyberattacks that targeted a Democratic candidate in a highly competitive congressional primary in southern California.

As Rolling Stone first reported in September, Democrat Bryan Caforio was the victim of what cybersecurity experts believe were distributed denial of service, or DDoS, attacks. The hacks crashed his campaign website on four separate occasions over a five-week span, including several hours before the biggest debate of the primary race and a week before the election itself, according to emails and other forensic data reviewed by Rolling Stone. They were the first reported instances of DDoS attacks on a congressional candidate in 2018.
Caforio was running in the 25th congressional district represented by Republican Rep. Steve Knight, a vulnerable incumbent and a top target of the Democratic Party. Caforio ultimately finished third in the June primary, failing to move on to the general election by several thousand votes.

“I’m glad the FBI has now launched an investigation into the hack,” Caforio tells Rolling Stone in a statement. “These attacks put our democracy at risk, and they’ll keep happening until we take them seriously and start to punish those responsible.”

It was unclear from the campaign’s data who launched the attacks. But in early October, a few weeks after Rolling Stone’s report, Caforio says an FBI special agent based in southern California contacted one of his former campaign staffers about the DDoS attacks. The FBI has since spoken with several people who worked on the campaign, requested forensic data in connection with the attacks and tasked several specialists with investigating what happened, according to a source close to the campaign.

According to the source, the FBI has expressed interest in several details of the DDoS attacks. The bureau asked about data showing that servers run by Amazon Web Services, the tech arm of the online retail giant, appear to have been used to carry out the attacks. The FBI employees also seemed to focus on the last of the four attacks on Caforio’s website, the one that came a week before the primary election.

An FBI spokeswoman declined to comment for this story.

A DDoS attack occurs when a flood of online traffic coming from multiple sources intentionally overwhelms a website and cripples it. The cybersecurity company Cloudflare compares DDoS to “a traffic jam clogging up a highway, preventing regular traffic from arriving at its desired destination.” Such attacks are becoming more common in American elections and civic life, according to experts who monitor and study cyberattacks. “DDoS attacks are being used to silence political speech and voters’ access to the information they need,” George Conard, a product manager at Jigsaw, a Google spin-off organization, wrote in May. “Political parties, campaigns and organizations are a growing target.”

Matthew Prince, the CEO of Cloudflare, told Rolling Stone last month that his company had noticed an increase in such attacks after 2016 and the successful Russian operations on U.S. soil.

“Our thesis is that, prior to 2016, U.S.-style democracy was seen as the shining city on the hill. The same things you could do to undermine a developing democracy wouldn’t work here,” Prince says. “But after 2016, the bloom’s off the rose.”

The FBI has since created a foreign influence task force to combat future efforts to interfere and disrupt U.S. elections.

Southern California, in particular, has seen multiple cyberattacks on Democratic congressional candidates during the 2018 midterms. Rolling Stone reported that Hans Keirstead, a Democratic candidate who had challenged Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), widely seen as the most pro-Russia and pro-Putin member of Congress, had been the victim of multiple hacking efforts, including a successful spear-phishing attempt on his private email account that resembled the 2016 hack of John Podesta, Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman. Hackers also reportedly broke into the campaign computer of Dave Min, another Democratic challenger in a different southern California district, prompting the FBI to open an investigation.

On Friday, the nation’s four top law enforcement and national security agencies — the FBI, Justice Department, Department of Homeland Security and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence — released a joint statement saying there were “ongoing campaigns by Russia, China and other foreign actors, including Iran” that include interference in the 2018 and 2020 elections. Cybersecurity experts and political consultants say there are many reports of hacking attempts on 2018 campaigns that have not been publicized. But the proximity of the attacks is significant because Democrats have a greater chance of taking back the House of Representatives if they can flip multiple seats in Southern California.

Source: https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/california-congressional-race-hack-745519/

Central planning bureau finds Dutch cybersecurity at high level

Dutch businesses and the public sector are well protected against cybersecurity threats compared to other countries, according to a report from the Central Planning Bureau on the risks for cybersecurity. Dutch websites employ encryption techniques relatively often, and the ISPs take measures to limit the impact of DDoS attacks, the report said.

Small and medium-sized businesses are less active than large companies in protecting their activities, employing techniques such as data encryption less often, the CPB found. This creates risks for small business and consumers that could be avoided.

The report also found that the Dutch are more often victims of cybercrime than other forms of crime. This implies a high cost for society to ensure cybersecurity. In 2016, already 11 percent of businesses incurred costs due to a hacking attempt.

The threat of DDoS attacks will only increase in the coming years due to the growing number of IoT devices. This was already evident in the attacks against Dutch bank websites earlier this year. A further risk is that over half the most important banks in the world use the same DDoS protection service.

According to the paper Financieele Dagblad, this supplier is Akamai. The company provides DDoS protection for 16 of the 30 largest banks worldwide. The Dutch banks ABN Amro, ING and Rabobank said they were not dependent on a single provider.

The CPB report also found that the often reported shortage of qualified ICT staff is less of a threat than thought. The number of ICT students has risen 50 percent in four years and around 100,000 ICT jobs have been added in the country since 2008. Already 5 percent of all jobs are in ICT. This puts the Netherlands at the top of the pack in Europe, alongside the Nordic countries.

Source: https://www.telecompaper.com/news/central-planning-bureau-finds-dutch-cybersecurity-at-high-level–1264818

‘Torii’ Breaks New Ground For IoT Malware

Stealth, persistence mechanism and ability to infect a wide swath of devices make malware dangerous and very different from the usual Mirai knockoffs, Avast says.

A dangerous and potentially destructive new IoT malware sample has recently surfaced that for the first time this year is not just another cheap Mirai knockoff.

Researchers from security vendor Avast recently analyzed the malware and have named it Torii because the telnet attacks through which it is being propagated have been coming from Tor exit nodes.

Besides bearing little resemblance to Mirai in code, Torii is also stealthier and more persistent on compromised devices. It is designed to infect what Avast says is one of the largest sets of devices and architectures for an IoT malware strain. Devices on which Torii works include those based on x86, x64, PowerPC, MIPS, ARM, and several other architectures.

Interestingly, so far at least Torii is not being used to assemble DDoS botnets like Mirai was, or to drop cryptomining tools like some more recent variants have been doing. Instead it appears optimized for stealing data from IoT devices. And, like a slew of other recent malware, Torii has a modular design, meaning it is capable of relatively easily fetching and executing other commands.

Martin Hron, a security researcher at Avast says, if anything, Torii is more like the destructive VPNFilter malware that infected some 500,000 network attached storage devices and home-office routers this May. VPNFilter attacked network products from at least 12 major vendors and was capable of attacking not just routers and network attached storage devices but the systems behind them as well.

Torii is different from other IoT malware on several other fronts. For one thing, “it uses six or more ways to achieve persistence ensuring it doesn’t get kicked out of the device easily on a reboot or by another piece of malware,” Hron notes.

Torii’s modular, multistage architecture is different too. “It drops a payload to connect with [command-and-control (CnC)] and then lays in wait to receive commands or files from the CnC,” the security researcher says. The command-and-control server with which the observed samples of Torii have been communicating is located in Arizona.

Torii’s support for a large number of common architectures gives it the ability to infect anything with open telnet, which includes millions of IoT devices. Worryingly, it is likely the malware authors have other attack vectors as well, but telnet is the only vector that has been used so far, Hron notes.

While Torii hasn’t been used for DDoS attacks yet, it has been sending a lot of information back to its command-and-control server about the devices it has infected. The data being exfiltrated includes Hostname, Process ID, and other machine-specific information that would let the malware operator fingerprint and catalog devices more easily. Hron says Avast researchers aren’t really sure why Torii is collecting all the data.

Significantly, Avast researchers discovered a hitherto unused binary on the server that is distributing the malware, which could let the attackers execute any command on an infected device. The app is written in GO, which means it can be easily recompiled to run on virtually any machine.

Hron says Avast is unsure what the malware authors plan to do with the functionality. But based on its versatility and presence on the malware distribution server, he thinks it could be a backdoor or a service that would let the attacker orchestrate multiple devices at once.

The log data that Avast was able to analyze showed that slightly less than 600 unique client devices had downloaded Torii. But it is likely that the number is just a snapshot of new machines that were recruited into the botnet for the period for which Avast has the log files, the security vendor said.

Source: https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/-torii-breaks-new-ground-for-iot-malware/d/d-id/1332930

190 UK Universities Targeted with Hundreds of DDoS Attacks

  • A large number of security attacks have been targeting universities all over the UK.
  • Over 850 DDoS attacks were analyzed across 190 universities.
  • Security experts suspect students or staff to be behind the large-scale attacks.

Over 850 DDoS attacks have taken place in the United Kingdom, that have targeted 190 universities in the 2017-2018 academic year. Security researchers from JISC studied all of the reported attacks and have found clear patterns that tie all of the attacks.

JISC is responsible for providing internet connectivity to UK research and education institutions. After a thorough analysis of all attacks during the past academic year, their study reveals that the attackers are most likely staff or students who are associated with the academic cycle. JISC came to this conclusion because the DDoS activity sees noticeable drops during holidays at universities. More importantly, most of the attacks were centered around the university working hours of 9 am to 4 pm local time.

Frequency of Cyberattacks against UK Universities
Image Courtesy of JISC

Head of JISC’s security operations center John Chapman revealed “We can only speculate on the reasons why students or staff attack their college or university – for the ‘fun’ of disruption and kudos among peers of launching an attack that stops internet access and causes chaos, or because they bear a grudge for a poor grade or failure to secure a pay rise”.

One of the DDoS attacks lasted four days and was sourced to a university’s hall of residence. A larger dip in attacks was noticed this summer compared to the summer of 2017. With an international law enforcement operation going into effect against the number one DDoS-for-hire online market. The website being taken down led to a massive drop in the number of DDoS attacks globally, which indicates that the attacks on the UK universities were not done by professional hackers working with a personal agenda, but hired professionals.

The motive behind these DDoS attacks is unknown, and it may serve as a cover for more sinister cybercriminal activity. Universities often store valuable intellectual property which makes them prime targets for many hackers.

Source: https://www.technadu.com/190-uk-universities-targeted-hundreds-ddos-attacks/42816/

DDoS Attack on German Energy Company RWE

Protesters in Germany have been camping out at the Hambach Forest, where the German energy company RWE has plans to mine for coal. Meanwhile, it’s been reported that RWE’s website was under attack as police efforts to clear the protesters from the woods were underway.

According to Deutsche Welle, unknown attackers launched a large-scale distributed denial-of-service (DDoS), which took down RWE’s website for virtually all of Tuesday. No other systems were attacked, but efforts to clear away the protesters have been ongoing for the better part of the month, and activists have reportedly made claims that they will be getting more aggressive in their tactics.

Activists have occupied the forest in hopes of preventing RWE from moving forward with plans to expand its coal mining operations, which would effectively clear the forest. In addition to camping out in the forest, the protesters have reportedly taken to YouTube to spread their message.

Reports claim that a clip was posted last week by Anonymous Deutsch that warned, “If you don’t immediately stop the clearing of the Hambach Forest, we will attack your servers and bring down your web pages, causing you economic damage that you will never recover from,” DW reported.

“Together, we will bring RWE to its knees. This is our first and last warning,” the voice from the video reportedly added.

DDoS attacks are intended to cripple websites, and the attack on RWE allowed the activists to make good on their threat, at least for one day.

““This is yet another example that illustrates the DDoS threat to [softer targets in] CNI [critical network infrastructure].  RWE is an operator of an essential service (energy) in Germany. The lights didn’t go out but their public-facing website was offline as a result of this attack,” said Andrew Llyod, president, Corero Network Security.

In a recent DDoS report, Corero researchers found that “after facing one attack, one in five organizations will be targeted again within 24 hours.”

Source: https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/ddos-attack-on-german-energy/

DDoS attack on education vendor hinders access to districts’ online portals

Multiple school districts are reportedly suffering the effects of a denial of service attack perpetrated against Blaine, Minn.-based Infinite Campus, a third-party online services provider.

As a result, district residents may be unable to reliably use services such as the “Parent Portal, through which teachers, parents and students can access information such as grades, class schedules and school notifications.

One such district is Oklahoma City Public Schools, which has issued an online statement to locals explaining that “Access to your student’s information through the parent portal may be limited or inaccessible due to the ‘denial of service’ attack on our provider, Infinite Campus.”

No data was breached or stolen in the incident, OCPS has assured residents. “Many districts across the country are impacted and authorities are investigating,” the notification continues. Indeed, the Natrona County School District in Wyoming has reportedly issued a similar statement.

Source: https://www.scmagazine.com/home/news/cybercrime/ddos-attack-on-education-vendor-hinders-access-to-districts-online-portals/

3 Drivers Behind the Increasing Frequency of DDoS Attacks

What’s causing the uptick? Motivation, opportunity, and new capabilities.

According to IDC Research’s recent US DDoS Prevention Survey, more than 50% of IT security decision makers said that their organization had been the victim of a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack as many as 10 times in the past year. For those who experienced an attack, more than 40% lasted longer than 10 hours. This statistic correlates with our ATLAS findings, which show there were 7.5 million DDoS attacks in 2017 — a rate, says Cisco, that is increasing at roughly the same rate as Internet traffic.

What’s behind the uptick? It boils down to three factors: motivation of the attackers; the opportunity presented by inexpensive, easy-to-use attack services; and the new capabilities that Internet of Things (IoT) botnets have.

Political and Criminal Motivations
In an increasingly politically and economically volatile landscape, DDoS attacks have become the new geopolitical tool for nation-states and political activists. Attacks on political websites and critical national infrastructure services are becoming more frequent, largely because of the desire and capabilities of attackers to affect real-world events, such as election processes, while staying undiscovered.

In June, a DDoS attack was launched against the website opposing a Mexican presidential candidate during a debate. This attack demonstrated how a nation-state could affect events far beyond the boundaries of the digital realm. It threatened the stability of the election process by knocking a candidate’s website offline while the debate was ongoing. Coincidence? Perhaps. Or maybe an example of the phenomenon security experts call “cyber reflection,” when an incident in the digital realm is mirrored in the physical world.

DDoS attacks carried out by criminal organizations for financial gain also demonstrate cyber reflection, particularly for global financial institutions and other supra-national entities whose power makes them prime targets, whether for state actors, disaffected activists, or cybercriminals. While extortion on the threat of DDoS continues to be a major threat to enterprises across all vertical sectors, cybercriminals also use DDoS as a smokescreen to draw attention away from other nefarious acts, such as data exfiltration and illegal transfers of money.

Attacks Made Easy
This past April, Webstresser.org — one of the largest DDoS-as-a-service (DaaS) providers in existence, which allowed criminals to buy the ability to launch attacks on businesses and responsible for millions of DDoS attacks around the globe — was taken down in a major international investigation. The site was used by a British suspect to attack a number of large retail banks last year, causing hundreds of thousands of pounds of damage. Six suspected members of the gang behind the site were arrested, with computers seized in the UK, Holland, and elsewhere. Unfortunately, as soon as Webstresser was shut down, various other similar services immediately popped up to take its place.

DaaS services like Webstresser run rampant in the underground marketplace, and their services are often available at extremely low prices. This allows anyone with access to digital currency or other online payment processing service to launch a DDoS attack at a target of their choosing. The low cost and availability of these services provide a means of carrying out attacks both in the heat of the moment and after careful planning.

The rage-fueled, irrational DDoS-based responses of gamers against other gamers is a good example of a spur-of-the-moment, emotional attack enabled by the availability of DaaS. In other cases, the DaaS platforms may be used in hacktivist operations to send a message or take down a website in opposition to someone’s viewpoint. The ease of accessibility to DaaS services enables virtually anyone to launch a cyberattack with relative anonymity.

IoT Botnets
IoT devices are quickly brought to market at the lowest cost possible, and securing them is often an afterthought for manufacturers. The result? Most consumer IoT devices are shipped with the most basic types of vulnerabilities, including hard code/default credentials, and susceptibility to buffer overflows and command injection. Moreover, when patches are released to address these issues, they are rarely applied. Typically, a consumer plugs in an IoT device and never contemplates the security aspect, or perhaps does not understand the necessity of applying regular security updates and patches. With nearly 27 billion connected devices in 2017, expected to rise to 125 billion by 2030 according to analysis from IHS Markit, they make extremely attractive targest for malware authors.

In the latter half of 2016, a high-visibility DDoS attack against a DNS host/provider was observed, which affected a number of major online properties. The malware responsible for this attack, and many others, was Mirai. Once the source code for Mirai was published on September 30, 2016, it sparked the creation of a slew of other IoT-based botnets, which have continued to evolve significantly. Combined with the proliferation of IoT devices, and their inherent lack of security, we have witnessed a dramatic growth in both the number and size of botnets. These new botnets provide the opportunity for attackers and DaaS services to create new, more powerful, and more sophisticated attacks.

Conclusion
Today’s DDoS attacks are increasingly multivector and multilayered, employing a combination of large-scale volumetric assaults and stealth infiltration targeting the application layer. This is just the latest trend in an ever-changing landscape where attackers adapt their solutions and make use of new tools and capabilities in an attempt to evade and overcome existing defenses. Businesses need to maintain a constant vigilance on the techniques used to target them and continually evolve their defenses to industry best practices.

Source: https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/3-drivers-behind-the-increasing-frequency-of-ddos-attacks/a/d-id/1332824

California Dem hit with DDoS attacks during failed primary bid: report

The campaign website of a Democratic congressional candidate in California was taken down by cyberattacks several times during the primary election season, according to cybersecurity experts.

Rolling Stone reported on Thursday that cybersecurity experts who reviewed forensic server data and emails concluded that the website for Bryan Caforio, who finished third in the June primary, was hit with distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks while he was campaigning.

The attacks, which amount to artificially heavy website traffic that forces hosting companies to shut down or slow website services, were not advanced enough to access any data on the campaign site, but they succeeded in blocking access to bryancaforio.com four times before the primary, including during a crucial debate and in the week before the election.

Caforio’s campaign didn’t blame his loss on the attacks, but noted that he failed to advance to a runoff against Rep. Steve Knight (R-Calif.) by coming up 1,497 votes short in his loss against fellow Democrat Katie Hill.

Caforio’s campaign tried several tactics to deter malicious actors, including upgrading the website’s hosting service and adding specific DDoS protections, which in the end failed to deter the attacks.

“As I saw firsthand, dealing with cyberattacks is the new normal when running for office, forcing candidates to spend time fending off those attacks when they should be out talking to voters,” Caforio told the magazine.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) told Rolling Stone that it offered to help Caforio’s campaign investigate the four attacks but received no response.

A DHS spokesperson did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill.

An aide to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the campaign arm for House Democrats, told Rolling Stone that it takes attacks such as the ones Caforio faced “very seriously.”

“While we don’t have control over the operations of individual campaigns, we continue to work with and encourage candidates and their staffs to utilize the resources we have offered and adopt best security practices,” the aide said.

Source: https://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/407608-california-democrat-hit-with-ddos-attacks-during-failed-primary-bid